Watershed Hydrology

Where Is the Water?
How Much Water Is There?
Water Budgets

Yavapai County Water Advisory Committee Information Series* 2009 #1

Where is the water? (And where isn’t the water?)
The question is interpreted by the TAC of the WAC to ask: where is developable groundwater? This is a high priority question for the WAC and much of the work that the WAC has funded has resulted in information relevant to the question.

While there are many sub-questions to the question of “where is the water?” the most simple answer is geographical and is supported by general geology, geophysics, and information obtained from wells. The most reliable and accessible groundwater resource in Yavapai is the aquifers composed of younger (Cenozoic age) sedimentary and volcanic rocks, not the older granite and metamorphic “basement” rocks.

Read More

Yavapai County Water Advisory Committee Information Series* 2009 #2

How much water is there?
The question is interpreted by the TAC of the WAC to ask: How much ground water is in storage and potentially available for recovery?

Groundwater in storage:
Due to definite physical and indefinite chemical limitations, not all underground water can be recovered and used for domestic supplies. Recoverable groundwater is the amount of water that can be physically and economically withdrawn from storage. Some groundwater that can be withdrawn is of poor quality.

Notwithstanding the above statements, Table 1 below shows a range of available stored groundwater in the Big Chino, Little Chino, and Verde Valley basin-fill aquifers (based on specific yield).

Read More

Yavapai County Water Advisory Committee Information Series* 2009 #3

The question is interpreted as: What are our best estimates of water budgets for the major basins in Yavapai County? This is a high priority question for the WAC and much of the work that the WAC has funded has resulted in information relevant to water budgets.

Water Budgets:
A water budget is a measure of the amount of water entering and the amount of water leaving a system. It is a way to evaluate all the sources of supply and the corresponding discharges with respect to a basin or aquifer. In hydrology, a water balance equation can be used to describe the water budget by mathematically accounting for the water budget components.

Read More

 

 
uvrwpc logo